Parent Conferences

The end of the school year means the time has come to schedule parent conferences.  This is a chance to receive culminating information about grades, aptitude, attitude, individual strengths and challenges.  Parent conferences are a time to share a child’s progression that is shown in several ways throughout the year.

When a parent schedules a conference it gives them the opportunity to share closing statements about their child’s experience to their teachers and school.  The parent has the chance to ask questions, make comments and to discuss recommendations and opportunities for their child’s continued studies, school responsibilities and possibilities. The goal of a parent conference is to begin planning for the next year in their child’s school experience.

Do you have a parent conference planned for your child?  Will you be requesting a parent conference?  Here are some suggestions for a successful meeting:

  1. Pay attention to the beginning time, place & length of a scheduled conference.  Typically the school has prepped for multiple conferences.  Each family has a start time that they have signed up for or that was given to them (if you are unable to be at the school exactly at your start time let your child's teacher know and reschedule your meeting). If you need a “non -traditional” time, please request this.
  2. If you feel that you need extended time for a conference due to concerns, questions or needed resources make this appointment as soon as possible with the reasons you have. If you have questions – ask them.  If you are looking for resources, ideas or opportunities for your child academically or socially, be specific and open to discussion.  If you have a concern about program, individual or school policy, the end of the year parent conference is not the appropriate meeting to address this.  It is recommended that a family schedule a different meeting because the end of the year parent conference is meant to reflect your child’s closing classroom experience.
  3. Be prepared, polite and positive!  You expect this from a professional educator so your child’s teacher will expect this from you.  Your child’s teacher has been a partner in skill development, values and the critical connections of friendship building.  Listen to the teacher share and discuss your child’s success and improvements or needs in their growing development in academic and social skills.  You should share stories of how you have seen this at home.
  4. This is a good time to find out about ways you can volunteer your time and talents to your child’s school!  Are there ways to help your child and family stay connected over the summer to their school and classmates?  Will there be literacy, sporting or carnival events to participate in? What is the best way to keep informed about important dates, current information and school news over the summer?
  5. Send the message in every way:  I am here for my child!

- Kate Dust, EduKids Education Director